Bible Storying

Published by: International Mission Board

The next wave of missions advance: Illiterates, functionally illiterates, semi-literates, storying cultures and many others who simply prefer a nonliterate approach can receive God’s Word.

This 7 module audio series on Chronological Storying will prepare you to reach those who prefer a non-literate approach.

Module 1: Making Disciples of Primary Oral Learners
Module 2: Choosing to Follow Jesus
Module 3: Living in the Family of Jesus
Module 4: Becoming Like Jesus
Module 5: Serving Like Jesus
Module 6: Multiplying Spiritual Disciples and Leaders  [more...]

Author: J. O. Terry
Published by: Orality Strategies

Radio by its nature crosses boundaries and barriers, penetrating to places which might be difficult to reach physically by a Bible storyer. Because the program is coming from a place remote from the listener there is a freedom to convey information which might stir up hostility if coming from a person present among the listeners.

In this practical article, the author describes how to develop Bible storying into radio programmes. Sections include:

  1. A look at the nature and characteristics of radio as related to Bible Storying
  2. A look at the characteristics of the radio audience as related to Bible Storying
  3. A look at Bible Storying as it relates to radio as a medium to convey storying
  4. A look at models of radio programs to use Bible Storying
  5. Crafting the Bible Storying script for radio
  [more...]
How to Communicate Velcro Truth in a Teflon World
Authors: Avery T Willis Jr, Mark Snowden
Published by: NavPress (2010)

"It thrills me to use Bible stories because I am actually telling people the Bible. I don't tell them some scholar's viewpoint or describe an ivory-tower argument. I let the Bible speak directly to them instead of depending on others' interpretations. The Holy Spirit interprets and applies the Bible to people's lives when we engage them with questions."

This book encourages us to "make truth stick like Velcro in a Teflon world" by using Bible stories, dialogue, drama, and songs to make disciples like Jesus did.

The focus is on the North American context, to reach the digital generation and the millions of Americans who can't, won't, or don't read.  [more...]

Translating a Story-tellers' Bible for storying
Author: CeliaB

Chronological Storying... needs to be underpinned by a solid, reliable translation in the target language.

To reach an isolated community, Chronological Storying can be an effective tool. However, storytellers need to be aware of the translation principles and key terms that are required to translate the stories into the local language, and know how to tell the story appropriately in that context. This case study describes how a team developed a Story-tellers' Bible — a source for storytellers — covering key Old and New Testament stories for different storying tracks. It outlines why storytellers still need to craft their own stories from this source text and describes the main characteristics of the Story-tellers' Bible.  [more...]

Author: Avery Willis (convenor)
Published by: Lausanne Committee for World Evangelization

Discover why orality is a growing phenomenon throughout the world in reaching others for Christ.

Around 70% of the world's population communicates mainly by stories, proverbs, drama, songs, poetry, and chants which all happens in a face-to-face context. Stories play an important role in forming every person's world view. Many times, Christian stories are presented in a culturally relevant way tackling basic worldview assumptions. In many cases, this may be the only way to replace or revise the audience's worldview that was learned by their stories.  [more...]

Learn to communicate God’s Word to oral-preference cultures
Monday 5 - Friday 9 November, 2018
Redcliffe College, Gloucester, UK
Sponsor: Redcliffe College, Wycliffe Bible Translators, SIL

The art of storytelling has far from died out, and the need for good biblical storytellers is as strong as ever in a world of oral cultures, postliterate societies and oral-preference learners.

If you are interested in story crafting, or are serving or planning to serve with a culture who either have no Scriptures, or prefer audio and visual ways of learning, then the Chronological Bible Storying course will give you the tools you need to be effective.

This course will equip you to help others engage with Scripture in a deep, relational way as you deliver the biblical narrative through the art of storytelling.

This unique course features no texts, no handouts, and no written aids. The intense 5-day course is entirely oral and participatory, and it is essential that you are able to attend each day.

Chronological Bible Storying will help you to:

  • help others learn and internalise the story
  • lead a discussion about the spiritual application of the story
  • begin storycrafting with a Bibleless language group, or people who have access to Scriptures but need help engaging with them

The dates for this course are 5-9 November 2018 (with an
optional pre-course social time together on the evening of 4
November). The tuition fees are £250 per student.

For more details on the course and booking information see Redcliffe's website.

Redcliffe’s Bible Storying course is delivered by the Centre for Linguistics, Translation and Literacy, a partnership with Wycliffe Bible Translators and SIL International.  [more...]

Published by: Lion Hudson

Five years ago Lion Hudson (a UK based publisher) was approached by the United Bible Societies with the need for an illustrated re-telling of the Bible narrative that was suitable for a wide age range including adults, culturally appropriate for non Western readers and which could be printed at a price that made it affordable for a mass market in the two thirds world with minimum or no subsidy. The organisations settled on a long-standing and successful title - The Lion Children's Bible - as the book that best met this requirement.  [more...]

An interactive journey through the Old Testament
Author: Jennifer Wright

In this detailed 17-page workshop guide from the Ndop region of North West Cameroon, Jennifer Wright describes how participants were taken on an interactive journey through the Old Testament:

What?
The Bible Overview Workshop is a two day workshop for leaders of church groups, such as listening group leaders and Sunday School teachers, with the aim of giving a basic knowledge of the overall Bible story and particularly aspects of the Old Testament which are important for understanding the New Testament.

Why?
We had trained people to be listening group leaders and children’s leaders, and they were generally doing well, however we realised that due to limited knowledge of the Old Testament, some were finding it challenging to lead their group because they were not prepared for the kind of questions that could come up unexpectedly when listening to or reading the New Testament – for example about the priests, the sacrificial system, the Passover feast, etc. Although they knew a lot of Bible stories, many did not have a very clear idea of what order they come in and how it all fits together.

How?
Geography: We had a simple map of the Ancient Near East on the wall and the whole room was set up to match the map. The participants moved around the room as they engaged with the material so they gained an understanding of the layout of the places we were talking about and the movements of the people of Israel, from Abraham’s first journey to Canaan to the return from Exile.

Timeline: Each participant received a blank timeline at the beginning of the course, and there was a large version of it on the wall. As we went through the material, we completed the timeline on the wall and the participants completed their own timelines to match it so they could take it home with them.

Telling Bible Stories together: We selected a set of stories to give a coherent summary of the Old Testament. Some stories which were well known to the participants were covered very briefly by letting them summarise them or in some cases act them out. Other stories were narrated or read from the Bible.

Questions: For several key passages, we asked questions based on the text in order to encourage discussion and bring out key points, especially when they would be referred to later. We also gave space for participants to ask questions.

Discussion topics – e.g. we finished the first day by making a large model Tabernacle (out of people, benches, a sheet, cardboard boxes, etc.) and then having a discussion of sacrifices, comparing the Old Testament sacrificial system to the local village’s sacrificial system.

Download a full description of the workshop as a PDF document.  [more...]