It's not enough to translate the Bible; it's not enough to distribute the Bible. Our desire is to see real Scripture Engagement: people encountering God's Word in life-changing ways. On this site you'll find news, events and resources for those encouraging Scripture use and Bible engagement around the world.
Monday 17 - Saturday 22 November, 2014
Redcliffe College, Gloucester, UK
Sponsor: Redcliffe College, Wycliffe Bible Translators, SIL

This intensive Bible Storying Course will give participants the skills to help people engage with God’s Word through the retelling of Biblical Stories. The method has been used with people who prefer audio or visual ways of learning as well as in cultures where the Bible is not available in printed form.

The course will help participants to:

  • Tell a story to a small group, help others to learn the story, and lead a discussion about the spiritual application of the story
  • Understand the worldviews of the group, which stories are most appropriate to the group and and how to adapt your story to a given worldview
  • Begin story crafting with a Bibleless language group, or people already with Scriptures but who need help in engaging with them to understand the Bible’s whole story. They could be somewhere remote or even in your own town in the UK or Europe!

For more details on the course and booking information see Redcliffe's website.

The course is taught in partnership with Wycliffe Bible Translators and SIL, as part of Redcliffe’s Centre for Linguistics, Translation and Literacy.  [more...]

Research conducted among US adults
Author: Barna Group
Published by: American Bible Society (2014)

The American Bible Society and Barna Group have published their annual research on the State of the Bible, "a comprehensive study of Americans' attitudes and behaviors toward the Bible".

For 2014, they identify six trends:

  1. Bible skepticism is now “tied" with Bible engagement. Skepticism or agnosticism about the Bible has increased and now stands at 19%, the same as the percentage of those who are Bible engaged (who read the Bible at least four times a week and believe it is the actual or inspired Word of God).
  2. Despite the declines, most Americans continue to be "pro-Bible." But "being pro-Bible doesn't necessarily mean Americans use the Bible regularly, however. Only 37% of Americans report reading the Bible once a week or more."
  3. Distraction and busyness continue to squeeze out the Bible. "Americans say they want to read the Bible — 62% wish they read Scripture more — they just don't know how to make time."
  4. The age of screens has come to stay in the Bible market. "In just a handful of years, use of tablets and smartphones for Bible searches has skyrocketed, from 18% in 2011 to 35% in 2014. That said, a strong majority still prefer to read the Bible in print (84%); the same holds true even among Millennials (81%)."
  5. Increasingly, people come to the Bible for answers or comfort. Although most come to the Bible to connect with God, there is an increase in those looking for pragmatic answers to life's problems.
  6. People are less likely to link moral decline with a lack of Bible reading. People blame decline on other things (movies, music, TV, etc).

Download the full report and infographics from the American Bible Society website.  [more...]